Adulting

"Adulting is a lot of fun and confusing.  It's a lot of things. Being responsible all the time for yourself and your safety." -Charlotte Iblauk

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Transitioning Into Adulthood

Rebecca Groom
Northwest Territories

Rebecca suggests some really great tips to help you on your transition to adulthood. Her advice is great for any age.

"Remember you are worthy of these great experiences and let yourself live in the moment." 
-Rebecca Groom

Tips & Tricks


Things You Are Now Responsible For

Your daily routine. 
When to go to bed, when to get up.
Buying groceries.
Cooking your own meals.
Paying for rent, cell phone, electricity, internet...
Keeping up with deadlines and due dates for school.
Cleaning your apartment.
Laundry.

Housemates/ Roommates

  • This may be the first time living with people other than your family, and it can feel odd at first but work to get to know them and understand your differences and similarities.
  • Proactively have meetings around food. This can help build a "family" and discuss issues or concerns with each other in a neutral atmosphere.
  • Discuss chores and doing them together. This will help motivate each other and not feel like one person is pulling their weight more than another.
  • Create a group chat to keep in contact with each other. It is great to help check in, let others know you might not be home until late, if there is an issue at the house, or to discuss meals for the week. It keeps everyone connected to what is happening.

Safety

  • Creating a group chat with roommates is a great way to keep tabs on each other for safety.
  • Knowing you you can go to for help and support is important. Outlining these supports beforehand will help ease some anxieties if and when a situation arises. Think about a safe place to stay if you need to leave your apartment. Who can you contact if you need to get away from unsafe partner or roommate. The Circles of Support graphic can help you preplan so that if a situation arises you are prepared. If you need to talk to someone there are Crisis Lines that can help.



Time Management

There is a whole section on this website dedicated to time management which you should check out. The information and resources will help you to stay ahead of bills, school work, and help with creating a routine that will support you through this transition. There is also some information there on setting goals.
Check it out!

Tools & Resources

The Choices Are Yours

For most of your life you have been told what to do, where to go, and what not to do. Now these choices are yours. It can be scary, but also amazing. Try something new, get out of your comfort zone, take healthy risks, talk to that cute person in your class, experience what life has out there for you. 
Yes people can say no, you might fall down, you might look silly, but you could also meet the love of your life, or find a new passion and make great memories. Don't let fear hold you back. 

A Guide to Beating the Fears That Are Holding You Back : zen habits

Roommate Conflict Scenerios

Here are a few articles that illustrate some conflict scenarios you may have with roommates and how to confront them before they become bigger problems. 

Seven college roommate conflicts — and solutions – The Mercury News


5 Awkward Housing Scenarios & How to Deal




Difficult Discussions: The Sandwich Method

Conflict may arise. This could be at home, at school, at work or with friends. It is better to talk about what you are feeling honestly rather than bottle it up or lie. Not dealing with a situation can make it become a bigger deal in the long run than it ever needed to be.
The Sandwich Method is a way to talk to anyone in a way that can help the conversation from being a blame session. It may seem weird at first but try it out, it works!

Solution Sandwich: How to Have Difficult Conversations : 5 Steps (with Pictures)